Dermaplaning, Hollywoods worst kept secret. A go to in the a-list, this treatment is said to exfoliate the skin, leaving it radiant whilst also eliminating peach fuzz (those little hairs on your face that you see in the light). The tool used? A surgical scalpel. Yes, really. When it comes to dermaplaning treatment there’s a lot of questions, so we are here to answer them!

Three things to know about this new facial treatment offered in our clinics:

How does it work?

This exfoliating treatment removes the dead cells on the skins surface using a surgical scalpel. At the same time, eliminating all the hair that is there. The complexion is immediately boosted and regains radiance. How? The accumulation of dead cells is the cause of dull complexion and pimples (clogged pores and blocked hair follicles). 

What are the results?

These are quite impressive – and visible right away! At first, you will notice some redness here and there and your skin may seem a little dry, but the side effects of this treatment are really minimal. So much so that it’s perfectly possible to book a dermaplaning session at lunch and be back in the office – about 40 minutes later – with an ultra glowy complexion. Only one must: apply sunscreen! After the treatment, your skin will be more sensitive to the sun’s rays.

How long does this last?

The results will be visible for several weeks. Dermaplaning will eliminate dead cells that have been accumulated for more than three weeks, which means that a month of purified skin will follow. If you like to take care of your face (just like us), then you will like it: the fact of eliminating dead cells will allow the beauty products used daily to penetrate deeper into the epidermis and therefore to be better absorbed and more effectively. The skin becomes smooth and makeup glides evenly. 

If you are interested by the dermaplaning treatment, book your consultation with us : 

Phone: 01844 390110

Email: [email protected]

Dr Fiona Durban qualified from St Mary’s Hospital Medical School (Imperial College, London) in 2000 and also gained a Batchelor of Science degree in Medical Anthropology from University College London. She then went on to do training in General Practice and MRCGP (merit) in 2005 and also became a full member of the British College of Aesthetic Medicine.